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By Eromosele Patrick Eidusi

From Prada’s black nylon to Basquiat’s thrown together style at Missoni, and a liberal spread of leopard print at Versace, check out 10 of the best of Milan Autumn/Winter collection.

PRADA

PRADA

Prada paid tribute to the iconic black nylon used for backpacks that made the brand famous in the 1990s. Four designers, including architect Rem Koolhaas, were invited to come up with a look using the fabric. Models wore ID badges suggesting a work uniform, while a greatest hits of Prada prints were shown in ‘Cut and sew’ shirts that fused the lipstick design of 2000 with 2016’s impossible true love.

MARNI

MARNI

The seating at Marni was an array of random objects- old TV sets, upright hoovers, even dodgem cars, photos of which were gleefully uploaded to Instagram by excited editors. With childlike pleasures a theme for Francesco Risso’s Marni man, a flotsam and jetsam necklace hung over a checked coat and trailing scarf  and a roomy pink coat was aspired with checked wool trousers decorated with gamboling squirrels.

MSGM

MSGM

MSGM cast students in place of models for the show at the University of Milan with Collegiate tropes featuring throughout. Sport wear, cords, puffer jackets and backpacks formed the core of the collection with graffiti – “tempodicambiare” (time to change) – as mottos on t-shirts and embroidered patches.

VERSACE

VERSACE

The unlikely inspiration behind the collection came from Versace Casa, the homewares section of the label. Think rich velvet in signature Versace designs, a liberal spread of leopard print, and sumptuous throw cushions. Hoodies and coats came trimmed in the short fringe usually found on cushions and velvet drapes were reimagined into a tracksuit and quilted jacket. Jewellery made from repurposed cutlery was wrapped around model’s wrist and bright tartans were used for suits and styled with football scarves and trainers.

MISSONI

MISSONI

Inspired by New York in the 80s and, in particular, Basquiat and his thrown together style, Missoni showcased colorful layers of Knitwear and loom Knit suits in mismatched stripes. One roll neck used 45 different colours of yarn. The collection also included a standout coat with micro-check knit seams and Jacquard animal prints.

FENDI

FENDI

Models marched around a moving baggage carousel in an ‘airport arrivals hall” with luggage snaking its way along unclaimed, presumably showers were forecast at the destination as several models wore umbrella hats and rain macs. Montage artwork by Hey Reilly, an instgram artist, featured on key piece of the collection.

NEIL BARRETT

NEIL BARRETT

Neil Barret explored the notion of uniforms from school to office suits and the Military. With an emphasis on tailoring, there were military coats and aviator jackets in army green, navy, black Khaki, sand and air force blue. Unusually for Barrett there was no pop of colour – three inky blue leather pieces were as bright as it got.

No21

No21

Alessandro Dell’Acqua’s collection for No21 focused on blazers, quilted sport jackets, leather coats and classic overcoats. The suggestion of an American road trip came with plaid shirts and Sherpa jackets and a retro motel sign print on a jumper and crushed silk shirt. The trend for brown took on a tobacco hue here.

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

Frozen landscape photographs by Thomas Flechtner, who also designed the snow covered set, inspired the crisscross print in the collection – meant to mimic nature’s patterns in snow. Suits dominated with a new ‘one ½ breasted jacket style, half way between single and double breasted. Mountain boots to navigate the terrain completed the look.

GIORGIO ARMANI

GIORGIO ARMANI

Clocking in at 93 different looks, this was a heavy weight collection. The focus was on tailoring with a gamut of styles from blazers and workers suits to shawl collar evening wear in velvet. A more relaxed style came with bomber jackets and cuffed trousers, some in velvet. Special mention goes to several convincing faux fur coats (Armani has been a fur free brand since 2016 when it abolished the use of real fur in all its collections).

Source: The Guardian

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