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The 2016 Olympics are finally upon us! We’re beyond excited about all the upcoming action but for now, I want to focus on what everyone’s wearing. While Nigeria was forced to wear white tracksuits after a mix up with the outfits, most other countries KILLED it during their grand entrances at the Opening Ceremony (special shout out to the Jamaican flag bearer and her AWESOME hair). Now we can’t wait to see what they’ll wear for the games. In view of making it a memorable and maximise performance, sports giants are putting on their lab coats and getting innovative with their performance apparel. This goes on to accentuate the fact that the right clothing matters.

High-tech apparel3

Nike used a 3-D printing technology to create small silicone protrusion that would help transmit airflow around the body of a runner. Adidas has also created a suit for swimmer that would maintain their ideal body form and Swiss cycling specialist Assos turned to wind tunnels to create form-fitting suits for the US cycling team. They have all maintained an ethical invention as not to create apparels that can be equating to sport doping.

The important of proper apparel cannot be over emphasised. The right one can help a person gain a three seconds lead which can be enough to win or lose a race. The wrong outfit can make everything you have worked hard for go wrong in just a twinkle of an eye. Clothing for speed events like cycling, swimming and athletics need to be form fitting so as to help build air resistance. Even if speed is not a factor, in place with hot climate such as Rio, brazil, irritations such as sweat and heat need to be minimised.

high tech clothes for olympians

For a competition like the Olympics, clothing will not magically make you the best without eating well, training and exercise. This does not mean that the wrong one will not hurt everything you have worked hard for. Hence, when making the choice of outfits, the athletes have to be careful that what they have chosen doesn’t impede on their performance. Using of the innovative apparels is not a must.

The manufacturing and testing of this clothing is done with enough caution as not to break the rules of the Olympics. This has ensured that the companies come up with the most creative ideas possible. If the idea succeeds, it is obviously not going to be available to every athlete. Imagine how weird it would look if an American company was making shoes that would give a Nigerian athlete as much advantage. The clothing doesn’t break rules no doubt but the glory for winning the medal would be left for the country. Anyone would make such invention exclusive.

High-tech apparel1

It is a lot to say Nigerian companies should look into creating clothing for our athletes, but it is not impossible. There have to be innovative minds that can look into this. Or at the least someone who will remember to pack the outfits!

#Stayfabulous and for more fashion tips and advice, check out our fashion section.

Written by Nkem Ikeh

 Image source: businessoffashion.com, fibre2fashion.com, today.ddns.net

Share This Post!

Share This Post!

The 2016 Olympics are finally upon us! We’re beyond excited about all the upcoming action but for now, I want to focus on what everyone’s wearing. While Nigeria was forced to wear white tracksuits after a mix up with the outfits, most other countries KILLED it during their grand entrances at the Opening Ceremony (special shout out to the Jamaican flag bearer and her AWESOME hair). Now we can’t wait to see what they’ll wear for the games. In view of making it a memorable and maximise performance, sports giants are putting on their lab coats and getting innovative with their performance apparel. This goes on to accentuate the fact that the right clothing matters.

High-tech apparel3

Nike used a 3-D printing technology to create small silicone protrusion that would help transmit airflow around the body of a runner. Adidas has also created a suit for swimmer that would maintain their ideal body form and Swiss cycling specialist Assos turned to wind tunnels to create form-fitting suits for the US cycling team. They have all maintained an ethical invention as not to create apparels that can be equating to sport doping.

The important of proper apparel cannot be over emphasised. The right one can help a person gain a three seconds lead which can be enough to win or lose a race. The wrong outfit can make everything you have worked hard for go wrong in just a twinkle of an eye. Clothing for speed events like cycling, swimming and athletics need to be form fitting so as to help build air resistance. Even if speed is not a factor, in place with hot climate such as Rio, brazil, irritations such as sweat and heat need to be minimised.

high tech clothes for olympians

For a competition like the Olympics, clothing will not magically make you the best without eating well, training and exercise. This does not mean that the wrong one will not hurt everything you have worked hard for. Hence, when making the choice of outfits, the athletes have to be careful that what they have chosen doesn’t impede on their performance. Using of the innovative apparels is not a must.

The manufacturing and testing of this clothing is done with enough caution as not to break the rules of the Olympics. This has ensured that the companies come up with the most creative ideas possible. If the idea succeeds, it is obviously not going to be available to every athlete. Imagine how weird it would look if an American company was making shoes that would give a Nigerian athlete as much advantage. The clothing doesn’t break rules no doubt but the glory for winning the medal would be left for the country. Anyone would make such invention exclusive.

High-tech apparel1

It is a lot to say Nigerian companies should look into creating clothing for our athletes, but it is not impossible. There have to be innovative minds that can look into this. Or at the least someone who will remember to pack the outfits!

#Stayfabulous and for more fashion tips and advice, check out our fashion section.

Written by Nkem Ikeh

 Image source: businessoffashion.com, fibre2fashion.com, today.ddns.net

Share This Post!