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Nigeria is a land that is very rich in tradition and culture. And even though now, most of us riding round in cars, talking on iPhones and insisting on not getting married till we’re thirty, we still acknowledge quite a few of those Nigerian traditions. Some however have gradually fallen away. Today we take a look at a few of those forgotten traditions:

Sharo Festival

nigerian traditions

Sharo simply means flogging and it was an olden day tradition that was practiced by the Fulani tribe. Young men who were of age and wanted to take a wife were flogged in the market space to test their perseverance and endurance of pain. Anyone who could not endure the pain till the end or scurried off after the first stroke was of course disqualified and had to wait till the next year.
Magun

nigerian traditions

Popular among the Yoruba ethnic group, Magun is supposed black magic placed secretly or openly on married women which harms any man she makes love with besides her husband. In worse case scenarios her lover can lose his life after somersaulting seven times or (lol) they both get stuck during the act!
Servicehood or Nwaboy

nigerian traditions

This practice is common among the Igbos and it basically involves a younger boy staying under the tutelage of his master for an agreed number of years in order to learn the gimmicks of the trade in return for a monetary or setup reward. This tradition still exists actually but seems to be going out of fashion due to a lot of disappointment by masters and lack of trust.
Tribal Marks

nigerian traditions

Each ethnic tribe in Nigeria has a particular tribal mark that is unique to their tribe. While tribal marks are becoming old fashioned and have been criticised by international media as being a barbaric practice, in a country with well over 200 languages and tribes, it served as a crucial means of tribal identification back in the day.
Fattening Room

nigerian traditions

Common to the Calabars in the past, a soon to be bride is subjected to seclusion for months in order for her to fatten up. Women were forced to eat huge servings of high calorie food daily, allowed lots of sleep, massaged and stretched all so they could gain excess weight. She was also taught necessary wifey skills like cooking, child care and apparently, love making. Though waning out, this tradition was carried out to make the bribe appear more enticing to potential suitors and also to symbolize the wealth, prosperity, good fortune and beauty by the bride to her would be husband.


What do you think of our traditions? Are there any we missed out? Let us know in the comments below.
Written by Treasure Asanammy

For more #TBT, check out which classic movie musicals still make us nostalgic till today. 

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