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It doesn’t take a soothsayer to tell Tiwa Savage’s latest single 49-99 is a massive hit.

tiwa-savage vogue

Since her debut hit single Kele Kele Love, the songstress, with every song, keeps rising to the very top, becoming one of the biggest female afro-beats artistes to ever come out Africa.

While attending her first New York fashion week, Vogue caught up with the singer and she sheds some light on the backlash she suffered on her journey from Boston back to Nigeria, the backlash received for some of her racy visuals and more.

While she referenced Lisa Folawiyo and Deola Sageo as major influencers of her fashion choices, she admits the styling for visuals for 49-99 are truly hers.

tiwa savage 4999

The sky blue dress uniforms reminiscent of primary school days, the long braids channeling Medusa she says were so heavy, she had to lay down for the shoot.

“I usually like to put tassels on my costumes on stage,” she says about the costume “It’s because I love the girls that used to dance for Fela Kuti, the godfather of Afrobeat. Every time I watch them, their skirts always have these tassels and when they’re moving and dancing it makes them look so sexy.”

She spoke on threaded hair in the 49-99 clip, saying she intended for it to provoke a specific childhood memory.

“We used to do that growing up, and I wanted to put that in for girls to see, or for guys to be like, ‘I remember I had a crush on a girl who used to do her hair like that!”

On the backlash she’s received from Nigeria’s largely conservative audience, she’s says:

tiwa-savage vogue

“I don’t really think of it too much. I just want to show that side of me. In the beginning of my career, I got a lot of backlash, but now it doesn’t stop me. I feel like it’s an extension of my art. It’s an extension of me.”

Visit vogue.com for more on the feature

Photo Credit: Brooklyn Wheeler

By Sarah Oyedo

Read also: Tiwa Savage Reps Elegant Street Style At The NYFW 2019

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